Mirantis OpenStack

  • Download

    Mirantis OpenStack is the zero lock-in distro that makes deploying your cloud easier, and more flexible, and more reliable.

  • On-Demand

    Mirantis OpenStack Express is on demand Private-Cloud-as-a-Service. Fire up your own cloud and deploy your workloads immediately.

Solutions Engineering

Services offerings for all phases of the OpenStack lifecycle, from green-field to migration to scale-out optimization, including Migration, Self-service IT as a Service (ITaaS), CI/CD. Learn More

Deployment and Operations

The deep bench of OpenStack infrrastructure experts has the proven experience across scores of deployments and uses cases, to ensure you get OpenStack running fast and delivering continuous ROI.

Driver Testing and Certification

Mirantis provides coding, testing and maintenance for OpenStack drivers to help infrastructure companies integrate with OpenStack and deliver innovation to cloud customers and operators. Learn More

Certification Exam

Know OpenStack? Prove it. An IT professional who has earned the Mirantis® Certificate of Expertise in OpenStack has demonstrated the skills, knowledge, and abilities needed to create, configure, and manage OpenStack environments.

OpenStack Bootcamp

New to OpenStack and need the skills to run an OpenStack cluster yourself? Our bestselling 3 day course gives you the hands-on knowledge you need.

OpenStack: Now

Your one stop for the latest news and technical updates from across OpenStack ecosystem and marketplace, for all the information you need stay on top of rapid the pace innovation.

Read the Latest

The #1 Pure Play OpenStack Company

Some vendors choose to “improve” OpenStack by salting it with their own exclusive technology. At Mirantis, we’re totally committed to keeping production open source clouds free of proprietary hooks or opaque packaging. When you choose to work with us, you stay in full control of your infrastructure roadmap.

Learn about Our Philosophy

Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 is Now Available for Download

on March 12, 2014

This past Friday March 7, 2014, we released Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 for download, including hardened packages for the OpenStack 2013.2.2 release, along with a set of fixes and improvements we think you’ll find useful. You can read up on the details of Mirantis OpenSack  in the release notes, but we wanted to highlight some key features and fixes in this version.

  • The latest  OpenStack release
    As mentioned, the Mirantis OpenStack hardened packages support the latest stable OpenStack Havana maintenance 2013.2.2 release. Fuel 4.1 deploys this version of OpenStack on CentOS or Ubuntu. (It’s worth noting that we completed the release within less than 30 days of the February 13 release of the stable upstream 2013.2.2 release).

  • Stop a deployment cleanly
    Whenever you’re in deployment mode for something as complex as OpenStack, things can go wrong, and the easier it is to get back to a known good state, the faster you can iterate with adjustments and changes. To that end, we’ve added two much-requested features we think you’ll find useful:

    • Stop Deployment: make a clean stop during deployment without waiting for the entire deployment to complete; any incompletely provisioned nodes are returned to their pre-deployment state, and you can continue where you left off

    • Reset Deployment: return all nodes in a completed deployment to their pre-provisioned state; that way, you can do a full “re-install” of an environment and still retain the majority of your previously-selected configuration parameters.

  • NIC Bonding
    While most servers have multiple physical network interfaces, it’s not unusual to allocate each of them to a different channel — one for storage, one for management, one for public, etc. The problem is that when you do that, you can’t get the full power of your available network interfaces to be more than what’s linked to any one physical connection — so even if you have four 1 gig connections, you don’t get 4 gig throughput. With NIC Bonding (also called “link aggregation”), which is now configurable through the Fuel UI, Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 you can easily aggregate the resources of all of your connections and split them one way or another — or roll them all together.

  • Better tenant isolation in the application catalog
    This release incorporates 0.4.1 of Murano, the  application catalog and data services lifecycle management addition for OpenStack. It now includes features such as per-tenant isolation, whereby modifications to service definitions can be limited to a single tenant. Floating IP auto-assignment, new in this Murano release, lets you assign a Floating IP to your application during the deployment, which allows a user to connect to any application built with Murano from an external network.

  • Savanna with plugin for Intel Distribution for Apache Hadoop (IDH)
    Savanna (which is being renamed ‘Sahara’) now features a plugin supporting the Intel Distribution for Apache Hadoop plugin; this plug-in enables features such as:

    • Installation and provisioning of Intel Hadoop Manager and Intel Hadoop

    • The ability to attach Cinder volumes to VMs with Intel Hadoop

    • Manual cluster scaling

  • Production-grade Ceph for ephemeral volumes
    In Mirantis OpenStack 4.0, we made it possible for the Nova (Compute) service in Mirantis OpenStack to support VM instances backed by ephemeral volumes stored in Ceph. With Glance, Cinder, and Nova all supporting the Ceph RBD backend, OpenStack VM instances can take advantage of Ceph clustered storage capabilities throughout the  life cycle of each VM. Since ephemeral volumes can be created as copy-on-write clones of Glance images, then recovered from Compute node failures thanks to Ceph object replication, and then shared among Compute nodes, this feature also enables live migration of VMs.

So those are some of the highlights of this release. As always, we continue to add capability to the Fuel control pane, and since it’s open source, your comments, questions, and contributions are always welcome.

Altogether, we’re continuing to work hard to make Mirantis OpenStack the fastest, easiest, and most flexible way to deploy and manage OpenStack at scale and in prodution. We invite you to download Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 today to see for yourself.

5 comments

5 Responses

  1. xiaobin Zhang

    Is it a known problem with Fuel 4.0?

    I recently download Fuel 4.0 and play with my VirtualBox, overall, this is very impressive that I have even seen.

    However when I play it, something trouble me much, and I don’t know if this is by-design or not.

    The fule’s network rule only works in VLAN, but if I don’t have VLAN, and only with 4 nic per hosts, then I can’t make it work. the Fule UI strictly check network interaction or overlap, for example, only public and floating network can be in same network, all others are must be in separate network, but Fuel asked so many different networks, like admin network, administrative network, VM network, storage network. In real world, why I must have so many different network? can I merge storage network with admin network? or can I merge admin network with administrative network together?

    This strict network rule check make it hard for real wire connection if I want to use this,

    Could you let me know if I make any mistake in using Fuel 4.0?

    Thanks!

    March 16, 2014 07:36
  2. Layton

    Hello~

    I have built some openstacks with Fuel 4.0,is there any method to update it to Fuel 4.1 without deleting my existing environment?

    Thanks!

    April 3, 2014 19:24
    • David J. Easter, Director of Product Management - Mirantis

      Hi Layton,

      The ability for the Fuel control plane to manage multiple versions of Mirantis OpenStack is tentatively scheduled for the next major release – which will hopefully be available by the Atlanta OpenStack summit. Once implemented, you’ll be able to upgrade Fuel and be able to manage previously deployed Mirantis OpenStack environments. Note that this won’t update the environment itself – e.g. if you install Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 hardened packages into an environment, the upgrade to Fuel 5.0 would not upgrade the environment to 5.0 – just the Fuel control plane itself. The ability to upgrade an entire environment from one version to another is planned for a future release beyond the next

      For now, the method to upgrade an environment from one version to another would involve migration rather than upgrade in place. For example, you could install Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 onto a small “seed cloud” and begin migrating workloads from your 4.0 environment into the 4.1 environment. As more resources are freed up in the 4.0 cloud, you can un-allocate those nodes and allocate them to the 4.1 environment.

      April 4, 2014 09:41

Continuing the Discussion

  1. Dell Open Source Ecosystem Digest #38 - Dell TechCenter - TechCenter - Dell Community

    […] Mirantis: Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 is Now Available for Download This past Friday March 7, 2014, we released Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 for download, including hardened packages for the OpenStack 2013.2.2 release, along with a set of fixes and improvements we think you’ll find useful. You can read up on the details of Mirantis OpenSack in the release notes, but we wanted to highlight some key features and fixes in this version. Read more. […]

    March 14, 201403:46
  2. Dell Open Source Ecosystem Digest #38 (englischsprachig) - TechCenter - Blog - TechCenter - Dell Community

    […] Mirantis: Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 is Now Available for Download This past Friday March 7, 2014, we released Mirantis OpenStack 4.1 for download, including hardened packages for the OpenStack 2013.2.2 release, along with a set of fixes and improvements we think you’ll find useful. You can read up on the details of Mirantis OpenSack in the release notes, but we wanted to highlight some key features and fixes in this version. Read more. […]

    March 17, 201404:28

Some HTML is OK


or, reply to this post via trackback.