Using OpenStack Database (Trove): Replication and Clustering

[Editor’s Note: In previous posts, we discussed the details of how Trove implements replication and clustering; now, in a 3-part series of guest posts from Tesora, we’ll look at how to use Trove to get those benefits.]

tesora2As applications migrate to the cloud, the complexity of operating databases in this new environment has become apparent. It is hard to operate a significant database infrastructure, even when you have the luxury of doing it in a controlled data-center on dedicated hardware. The cloud introduces performance variability and an overhead due to virtualization, and provides an end user with a much lower level of control over the underlying hardware. In the public cloud, reliability of an individual virtual machine instance is considerably lower than that of a dedicated machine in a data-center. When operating a large fleet of servers, observed failures are much more frequent. All of these make operating a database in the cloud much more challenging.

OpenStack Trove Day: A Deep Dive into DBaaS is a full-day dedicated to sharing the latest development on OpenStack Database as a Service. Find out why leading enterprises are adopting OpenStack and Trove. August 19th in Cambridge, MA.

Database-as-a-Service simplifies the use of databases in the cloud by relieving the administrator of much of the administrative burden in operating the infrastructure. By being closely tied with the underlying infrastructure and automating many common operations, DBaaS considerably simplifies many of these activities. Failures, however, could cause interruptions in the service, and therefore it is essential that the DBaaS platform accounts for these and handles them in a manner that makes failures totally transparent to the end user.

Trove accomplishes this in several ways. First, Trove is closely tied to the underlying OpenStack infrastructure, integrated closely with Nova, Neutron, Swift, Cinder and Keystone. It automates a considerable amount of the configuration and setup steps required in launching a new server, similar to the way that other tools such as Puppet, Chef, and Ansible work.  It also allows a site administrator to establish standard configurations and reliably launch servers with those configurations.

One area where this configuration support is especially important is in the case of Clustering and Replication. Without Trove, a user would have to manually configure these features and manage failures and failover by themselves. Trove promises to automate these capabilities, and the functionality is being implemented in phases.

The initial implementation of replication in Trove will be for MySQL data stores using the built-in MySQL replication feature. Subsequent phases will extend this capability to include clustering and replication for all data stores that Trove supports. In the first release of this feature, users will be able to create a single MySQL instance, and then create a slave of that instance. The act of creating the slave will establish a new instance, which will be the replication peer of the initial instance.

The following commands illustrate how a user would do this. Consider first the following operating Trove instance running MySQL version 5.5:

$ trove list
+--------------------------------------+------+-----------+-------------------+--------+-----------+------+
| ID                                   | Name | Datastore | Datastore Version | Status | Flavor ID | Size |
+--------------------------------------+------+-----------+-------------------+--------+-----------+------+
| d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322 | m1   | mysql     | 5.5               | ACTIVE | 7         |  
$ trove list
+--------------------------------------+------+-----------+-------------------+--------+-----------+------+
| ID                                   | Name | Datastore | Datastore Version | Status | Flavor ID | Size |
+--------------------------------------+------+-----------+-------------------+--------+-----------+------+
| d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322 | m1   | mysql     | 5.5               | ACTIVE | 7         |    2 
+--------------------------------------+------+-----------+-------------------+--------+-----------+------+

One would now create a second (slave) instance referencing the master provided above, as follows.

$ trove create s1 7 --size 2 --slave_of d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322
+-------------------+--------------------------------------+
| Property          | Value                                |
+-------------------+--------------------------------------+
| created           | 2014-06-13T14:33:27                  |
| datastore         | mysql                                |
| datastore_version | 5.5                                  |
| flavor            | 7                                    |
| id                | 9ffc7b3a-9205-412a-9cd2-521f95755c43 |
| name              | s1                                   |
| slaveOf           | d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322 |
| status            | BUILD                                |
| updated           | 2014-06-13T14:33:27                  |
| volume            | 2                                    |
+-------------------+--------------------------------------+

The user can now look at the state of the replicated pair as shown below.

$ trove show 9ffc7b3a-9205-412a-9cd2-521f95755c43
+-------------------+---------------------------------------------+
|      Property     |         Value                               |
+-------------------+---------------------------------------------+
|      created      | 2014-06-13T14:33:27                         |
|     datastore     | mysql                                       |
| datastore_version | 5.5                                         |
|       flavor      | 7                                           |
|         id        | 9ffc7b3a-9205-412a-9cd2-521f95755c43        |
|        name       | s1                                          |
|       slaveOf     | d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322        |
|       status      | ACTIVE                                      |
|      updated      | 2014-06-13T14:33:27                         |
|      volume      | 2                                            |
+-------------------+---------------------------------------------+
$ trove show d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322
+-------------------+---------------------------------------------+
|     Property     |         Value                                |
+-------------------+---------------------------------------------+
|      created      | 2014-06-13T14:33:27                         |
|     datastore     | mysql                                       |
| datastore_version | 5.5                                         |
|       flavor      | 7                                           |
|         id        | d2bd91ef-3d7c-43ae-97a9-f0726c91d322        |
|        name       | s1                                          |
|       slaves      | 9ffc7b3a-9205-412a-9cd2-521f95755c43        |
|       status      | ACTIVE                                      |
|      updated      | 2014-06-13T14:33:27                         |
|       volume      | 2                                           |
+-------------------+---------------------------------------------+

To disconnect a slave from a master, the user would “detach”:

$ trove detach_replication <slave instance>

Now that you know the basic mechanics of Trove’s replication feature, in the next post, we will describe the implementation of the Client and the Task Manager in detail.

Amrith Kumar is Founder and CTO of Tesora. Tesora is developing an enterprise ready, easy to use Database-as-a-Service platform based on OpenStack Trove.  Amrith Kumar brings more than two decades of experience delivering industry-leading products for companies specializing in enterprise storage applications, fault tolerant high performance systems and massively parallel databases to Tesora, which he co-founded. 

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